by Jayson DeMers

There are many moving pieces in an SEO campaign, but only a handful of broad categories of tactics to use regularly. For example, most people intuitively group tactics into the categories of on-site optimization and off-site optimization, which are clearly defined by whether a given tactic takes place on your site or somewhere else. But there are different dimensions to consider as well–for example, you can think of a split between technical SEO and reputation management tactics.

Which of these are more important to the success of your overall campaign?

Reputation Management

Reputation management, as the name suggests, is all about building up your brand’s image online. This could involve a number of tactics, including the publication of valuable content on other websites, the promotion of your brand name and image, and the establishment of personal relationships with your customers.

For example, MediaOne suggests optimizers create LinkedIn Groups and post regularly to enhance their reputation; not only will you gain more social followers, you’ll also earn backlinks and establish ground for publishing content in the future.

There are a number of benefits to these tactics:

  • Brand visibility and recognition. Obviously, your reputation will grow with reputation management tactics. More people will see your brand, you’ll rank higher for branded searches (and see more of them), and the visitors you attract will be more acquainted with your business. That means higher click-throughs for all your rankings, and more conversions when they get to your site.
  • Backlinks. Reputation building is also a good way to earn more inbound links. If people read your content and value it, they’ll be more likely to link to you as a credible source, which will boost your domain authority.
  • Guest posting and future potential. Building your reputation also opens the door to bigger and more authoritative publishers for guest posting opportunities. These give you immediate benefits of brand visibility and inbound links, but also a path to even better opportunities in the future.

Technical SEO

Technical SEO, on the other hand, is all about making precise adjustments to your site to improve its visibility in search engines. Here, you could update your site’s code to be cleaner and easier to crawl, target specific keywords and include them in your page titles and meta descriptions, and even rebuild different areas of your site.

For example, QuickSprout notes the importance of user retention, and encourages optimizers to make tweaks to their websites so they load faster and preserve a worthwhile user experience.

There are several benefits here:

  • Real search visibility. Google can’t rank your site if its search engine bots can’t see it. Your biggest priority with technical SEO is making sure that search engines are able to process your site to index and display it accurately.
  • Precise targeting. Technical SEO also gives you the ability to make and reach for precise targets. You’ll have the opportunity to research various keywords and keyword phrases, and reorganize your site to rank for them.
  • Troubleshooting. If something goes wrong with your site, technical SEO will give you the tools to analyze the problem and eventually correct it.

The Problems With One Over Another

After reading this far, you may intrinsically favor one over the other. However, there’s a problem with identifying one set of tactics as “better” or “more important.” If you focus exclusively on technical SEO, you won’t have the opportunity to develop your brand reputation; you may slowly climb the ranks for a handful of specific keyword terms, but your visitors will be apathetic to your brand, and you won’t grow nearly as quickly without reputation management.

On the other hand, if you ignore technical SEO and focus only on reputation management, you could overlook a key fixture that’s necessary for search engine visibility. For example, you might update your robots.txt file incorrectly or accidentally make your site uncrawlable. You’ll get a respectable volume of customers from other areas, but your direct rankings in SERPs will tank.

The truth is, no SEO campaign can survive while only pursuing one of these sets of tactics. You’ll need both if you want to establish a wider presence. Technical SEO is necessary to be seen and properly “understood” by search engines, but reputation management is necessary if you want to reach people and grow at a reasonable pace.

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by Jayson DeMers

Creating and managing a website is a big step for a business, but just having a website isn’t enough. Establishing a web presence on the web is equivalent to constructing a building for your business in the real world; you can make it pretty on the outside and pretty on the inside, but that doesn’t guarantee any foot traffic, and it certainly doesn’t guarantee any patronage.

If you’re going to maximize the revenue potential of your site, you need to understand who’s coming to your site, why they’re coming to your site, and what you can do to increase those numbers. Fortunately, Google’s free Analytics platform gives you these kinds of insights in great detail. But you still need to know what you’re looking at.

There are tons of different metrics to track in Analytics, and it can be confusing if you’re a first-timer. Instead of trying to learn all the details immediately, narrow your scope to observing patterns in the Acquisition tab–this is going to tell you where your traffic is coming from. Here, you’ll find four major sources of traffic, from which you can gather valuable insights about your site:

1. Direct Traffic.

Direct traffic is measured by visitors who visit your site without any online source directing them to it. For example, if a user types in your URL directly or calls upon it from a stored bookmark, it’s considered a direct visit. Direct visits generally come from one of a few types of consumers–they could be people who heard about your brand offline, repeat visitors who wanted to come back, or even your internal staff checking the site for errors (though you can filter this last segment out entirely for more accurate data). You can improve this traffic by increasing repeat visits and stepping up your brand awareness efforts offline, though as you might imagine, the offsite route is a bit less efficient than other methods.

2. Organic Traffic.

Organic traffic refers to inbound visitors who found your site through search engines. Any traffic from Bing, Google, and other search sites is counted in this data. This is most useful for practitioners of SEO, who use content, links, and other strategies to increase their likelihood of ranking high for various relevant searches–higher organic traffic generally means greater success with the strategy. However, branded searches also count toward this total. If your site is new, this figure will undoubtedly be low, but you can increase this number by optimizing your site, producing regular content, establishing relationships with outside authorities, and getting active on social media. It takes time to develop the domain authority necessary to earn this type of traffic, but it can be a lucrative source in the long term.

3. Referral Traffic.

Referral traffic accumulates any visits that came from outside sources. If links to your site are available on external sources, users can follow those links to find your site. Link building in SEO (or through guest posting) are valuable for this. You might also earn links from local directories or industry directories, provided you submit your information to them. Getting a link published on a high-profile source with tons of traffic can route significant droves of users to your site, but the more valuable a link is, the harder it is to get. Keep a close eye on your link development strategy to increase referral traffic–you might also consider placing affiliate links, which cost a bit of extra money but can be valuable opportunities for getting new traffic. Some links might even crop up naturally if outside sites choose to cite your information–click into the Referral traffic section to see exactly which sources are generating the most traffic to your site.

4. Social Traffic.

Last but not least is social traffic, which can refer to any inbound users from social media sites. The more active you are on social media and the more attractive your links are (think about providing value to users rather than advertising your brand or products), the more visitors you’re liable to get. Over time, as you build a following, this number can skyrocket. If you click into the Social traffic area, you’ll be able to see exactly which platforms are generating the most traffic, and you can weight your strategy to favor those platforms.

Understanding and tracking these four sources of traffic, you’ll learn your users’ strongest preferences, and you’ll be able to cater to those preferences with your marketing strategies and ongoing site development.

As you grow more familiar with Google Analytics, you’ll be able to analyze user behavior on-site, track user demographics, use goals to maximize conversions and generate more revenue, and branch out to other analytics platforms and business intelligence tools to build an ever-clearer picture of your website’s traffic data–but none of this is possible without suitable initial traffic.

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Infographic Courtesy of: Take1.tv

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9 Tips for Artists Looking for More Search Visibility

 

by Jayson DeMers

Most artists these days maintain a website to sell their services, or at least a blog to show their work. But it’s hard to earn new commissions and work opportunities — whether in the form of a music gig or audience at an art show — unless you can generate a steady stream of traffic to your site.

There are many viable ways to earn such traffic. For example, you can pay for advertising, or build a social media audience first. There’s usually a downside, however: Paying for advertising requires upfront capital that most artists don’t have, and building a social media audience can be an unpredictable and even counterproductive mission.

The Search Engine Optimization (SEO) Advantage

Search engine optimization (SEO) is one of the best strategies for additional visibility, and that goes for artists, too. It’s fairly inexpensive, especially when compared to outright advertising; it doesn’t require a base following to start; it requires no formal expertise (at least, again, in the beginning); and it has the potential to grow your traffic exponentially — both in a local area and on a national basis.

Higher search rankings will almost always result in higher inbound traffic. So as long as your site’s content and conversion rates are in order, attention to SEO is going to lead to greater interest in your services.

Tips for Artists and Musicians

So how can an artist make the most of this strategy? In addition to following standard best practices for SEO, you’ll particularly want to employ the following tactics:

1. Declare a niche for yourself.

Make sure you have a dedicated, specific niche that you serve, and be as specific as possible. This specificity will ensure you don’t have much competition. For example, if you knit blankets, don’t just optimize for terms such as “knitted blankets”; get more specific with terms like “custom knitted blankets for newborns” or “knitted blankets with nerdy design.”

2. Make your services clear on dedicated pages.

Dedicated pages with associated keyword terms aren’t as essential as they used to be, but they’re still valuable for artists and musicians. Most people are going to be searching for your goods based on the type of service you’re performing, so keep at least one or two pages that have rich content focused on what you actually do.

3. Use a personal brand.

Even if you have a regular brand (such as a dedicated store for your products or a band name), you’ll want to use a personal brand in conjunction with it. A personal brand will help you increase the visibility of your content, and increase the appeal of your business for prospective customers.

4. Keep your branding consistent.

No matter what you’re doing — whether it’s on your own site, a publisher’s site, or social media — keep your branding consistent. Sooner or later, people will search for you by name, so you’ll want to keep all your brand names and identity signatures as consistent and recognizable as possible over the long run.

5. Write about your trade.

People are always interested in learning arts, crafts, and music, so take the time to write a blog about your trade. Don’t necessarily give away the “secret sauce,” but you should go out of your way to share your knowledge and expertise. This will make your content highly shareable and visible, which is an easy shortcut to getting more backlinks for your page (and therefore more domain authority to boost your rankings).

6. Incorporate multimedia content.

You’re an artist, so show off the goods! Make sure you’re incorporating plenty of examples of multi-media content on your site, including images, video, and sound clips. Optimize these features with appropriate titles and description tags so they can easily be found through search.

7. Network with other artists.

Get to know other local artists, and network with them online. Work on sharing one another’s content, and cross-pollinate your social media followings (especially if you serve complementary niches). Any boosts in visibility you garner will help you both out.

8. Get involved in local events.

Local SEO is a good shortcut for fast visibility … especially for artists, who usually have a specifically local appeal. Get involved in local events, and write about your presence: You’ll get some love from the event hosts, and you’ll build your relevance for your region. On top of that, you’ll probably earn some backlinks, which make it even easier to land a spot in the local “3-pack.”

9. Attract reviews.

One of the best ways to build local search visibility is through positive online reviews. The more reviews you have on third-party directory sites, and the more highly rated they are, the more likely you’ll be to appear in the local 3-pack. Publicize your listings in these areas, and try to optimize your reviews (without soliciting them directly).

Keeping Things Affordable

Plenty of SEO agencies and professionals can help you earn higher rankings, but they may cost several thousand dollars a month or more. As a budding artist or musician, you may not have access to that kind of cash.

Instead, focus on building your rankings as frugally as possible. Spend a few hours learning the basics of SEO on your own, and focus on the tactics you can do effectively on your own. You may run into issues, and eventually find it helpful, even necessary, to enlist professional services; but to get started, you don’t need much. Prioritize the fundamentals; you can always build from there.

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6 Ways to Optimize for Searches Other Than Google

 

by Jayson DeMers

When people think about search engine optimization, they usually want to know how to make their site rank higher in Google. Every business has a website and Google is responsible for two-thirds of all searches online… so if you’re going to rank for one search engine, it should be Google.

But Google isn’t the only search engine that people use, and it’s not the only one worth optimizing for — especially if you serve a particular niche or operate within a certain industry that may generate traffic from another angle.

Alternatives for Optimization

Depending on your line of work, you might wish to include these search alternatives in your optimization strategy:

1. Amazon.

As BigCommerce explains, Amazon’s number-one goal is to make buyers happy — which means giving them more of what they want, and a better experience overall. To begin with, how you optimize your product listings plays a huge role in how you’ll turn up in search. Make sure to fill out all categories, tags, titles, and descriptions as fully and accurately as possible, so you’ll be viewed as a relevant entry. From there, your best bet is to garner lots of validations. For example, you’ll want to amass inbound links that point to your product, and you’ll require lots of positive reviews from users to earn higher rankings.

2. eBay.

This site works much the same way Amazon does, so it’s an excellent target for optimization. Your product descriptions and images will play a huge role in your rankings, as well as your seller rating and reputation. Because the listings are more temporary, though, links won’t help you as much here.

3. YouTube.

According to Search Engine Watch, the best YouTube optimization strategies start with keyword research: You’ll create and name your videos according to YouTube’s most popular searches. Make sure all your videos are named concisely and accurately, and pay the same level of attention to your categories, tags, and channel descriptions. The number of likes, comments, and views you attract also plays into your ranking, so encourage your audience to participate in these areas.

4. Etsy.

This is one of the few online marketplaces that goes out of its way to help sellers optimize their listings. Ideal for crafters and artists, Etsy encourages sellers to choose strong keywords, optimize their shop titles and descriptions, and earn plenty of backlinks for their products (not to mention maintaining a good reputation in the community).

5. Bing.

Google still dominates, but Bing is making a respectable effort, and currently gets more than 20 percent of all searches on the web. Bing comes as a default with most Microsoft products (because it is one of them). As a result, it tends to be more popular with older demographics. If you’re targeting older populations, this makes it a key tool for optimization. Bing works in much the same way Google does, but with a few differences: It doesn’t favor backlinks as heavily, it prefers old, established content to fresh material, and it’s a bit more literal when it comes to keywords and titles.

6. DuckDuckGo.

According to Neil Patel, DuckDuckGo’s greatest advantage is the privacy it offers to users. It doesn’t track or keep user search history the way Google does, so if you want to optimize for it, you’ll have to take a different approach. DuckDuckGo users are concerned about their privacy, so if that sounds like your target demographic type, focus on semantic search queries on a national level. DuckDuckGo’s local search isn’t as robust, but it does try to intuit user intention the way Google and Bing do.

How to Decide What’s Worth Optimizing For

If you’ve looked at this list and wondered how you’ll find time to optimize for all of them, relax. Not all businesses will benefit from optimizing for all these channels. You only need to focus on the two or three — or possibly just one — that best suits you and your clientele.

For instance, if you don’t produce a lot of videos on a regular basis, you don’t need to optimize for YouTube. If most of your business comes in via Amazon, you can focus your efforts there instead of eBay.

The good news is, most optimization standards work more or less the same, with an emphasis on quality and relevance for incoming searches. Apply those general principles no matter what kind of content you’re producing, and you’ll get a head start in every optimization application–even the ones you aren’t directly pursuing.

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